When fracking came to suburban Texas

Social, legal and health issues related to air and water toxic pollution in Australia.

When fracking came to suburban Texas

Postby HVPA_research » Wed Jan 02, 2013 2:41 pm

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When fracking came to suburban Texas
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/dec/31/fracking-in-towns-texas-oil
Residents of Gardendale, a suburb near the hub of the west Texas oil industry, face having up to 300 wells in their backyards


Some cities have moved to limit fracking or ban it outright – even in the heart of oil and gas country. Tulsa, Oklahoma, which once billed itself as the oil capital of the world, banned fracking inside city limits. The authorities in Dallas last week blocked what would have been the first natural gas well in town. The town of Longmont, just outside Denver, meanwhile, is fighting off attempts by industry groups to overturn a fracking ban.

But Gardendale, a suburb of 1,500 people near the hub of the west Texas oil industry, exists in a legal and political environment in which there are seemingly few restrictions on fracking, even inside city limits. For residents here, fracking is part of daily life.

"You can hear it, you can smell it, and you are always breathing it. It's just like being behind a car exhaust," said Debbie Leverett, during a tour of the area last October organised by the Society of Environmental Journalists. "All of your senses change."


Over the last few years oil companies have drilled 51 wells in Gardendale, an area that covers about 11 square miles – and that's just the start.

Berry Petroleum, the main oil developer, plans to drill as many as 300 wells in Gardendale. "Berry's current plan is to drill approximately 140 wells on 40-acre spacing in and around the Gardendale area," Jeff Coyle, a company spokesman, wrote in an email. "Additionally, we are preparing to conduct a pilot study on 20-acre spacing and, if those test results are encouraging and economic conditions warrant, we may drill up to 160 additional wells."

Some of those wells will be drilled within 150ft of residents' front doors – far closer than in other towns in Texas


"People are still not really happy when an oil well turns up in the backyard," said Wes Perry, Midland's mayor and an oil man himself. But he added: "We are an oil town. We can't be hypocrites."


However, Gardendale lacks the legal authority to keep fracking at a distance. The suburb, just outside Midland and Odessa, is unincorporated, so it does not have the legal authority to impose zoning restrictions. Residents voted down an attempt to incorporate last year, fearing it would lead to higher taxes.

Berry argues the close proximity serves to encourage industry and residents to co-exist. "What we have here is a situation where we have to find the best way to work together, where mineral rights owners and surface rights owners can co-exist," Coyle said.


In Australia we also hear quite a lot of co-existence between the coal seam gas and the local residents. For example, AGL wants to drill for CSG under Sydney residential suburbs and under Hunter vineyards. There are no laws and regulations to prevent them placing drilling pads as close as 200m from peoples homes. Yet the CSG industry, with the blessing of the state governments, persists with their plans to invade residential areas. Why are they are so gun-ho that they have the right to go anywhere they feel like? Do they expect local residents to take this laying down? They have nothing to offer to the local residents not even a share in their profits. They are planning to create, what are essentially heavy chemical industry facilities, at the footsteps of people's homes.

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